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Wildflower Planting 2021

What to look out for in our wildflower planting areas

We planted  plug plants and sowed seeds of these 12 species in 2021, chosen to augment the existing seed bank. They are species which had already been recorded in the area by us  or previously by the BSBI (Botanical Society for Britain and Ireland), and with the new mowing regime we are hoping that our additions  will help the existing populations to recolonise the commons.

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SelfHeal
SelfHeal

Prunella vulgaris Selfheal can creep through the short turf of a grassland or the uncut grass of a woodland clearing; it can even pop up in lawns that haven't been treated with chemicals. Clusters of violet flowers from June to October provide a nectar source for bees and wasps.

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Betony
Betony

Betonica (Stachys) officinalis This is a valuable source of nectar and pollen for bees late in the season. A plant of meadows, grassy heaths, hedge banks and open woodlands, sadly, betony has suffered from the catastrophic loss of meadows and the decline in woodland coppicing.

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Common knapweed
Common knapweed

Centaurea nigra Knapweed is a firm favourite of our pollinating insects, being a source of good quality nectar. And as well as supporting our bees, butterflies and beetles its seeds provide food for many birds.

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Meadow buttercup
Meadow buttercup

Ranunculus acris The petals of buttercup flowers trap a thin layer of air between two layers of cells. This gives them a mirror-like quality that reflects light, making them highly visible to pollinators (and good at predicting a love of butter!).

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Meadow vetchling
Meadow vetchling

Lathyrus pratensis Scrambling up and over other plants around it for support, the narrow green leaflets have tendrils at their tips to help them grab surrounding vegetation. Clusters of between 5 and 12 bright yellow pea-shaped flowers are produced on long, upright stems.

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Ox eye daisy
Ox eye daisy

Leucanthemum vulgare Studies have shown the ox eye daisy to be one of the highest-ranked producers of pollen within British wildflower meadows. It is utilised by a plethora of invertebrates including beetles, bees, ants, butterflies, moths, flies and many more, all of whom can take advantage of its substantial yellow 'landing-pad.'

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Common poppy
Common poppy

Papaver rhoeas Poppy seeds need disturbed earth to germinate, which is why so many grew on the battlefields of WWI. Thought to be native to the eastern Mediterranean region, the poppy was probably intruduced to NW Europe in the seed-corn of early settlers. Very popular with bumblebees.

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Red Campion
Red Campion

Silene dioica Just as the bluebells finish flowering in our woodlands, red campion starts to come into bloom and brighten up roadsides, woodlands and hedges throughout the summer. Red campion is a good source of food for moths, bees and butterflies.

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Salad Burnet
Salad Burnet

Sanguisorba minor A low-growing herb of chalk and limestone grassland that produces rounded, reddish flower heads from May to September. Its leaves smell of cucumber if crushed or walked upon, and are a popular addition to salads and summer drinks.

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Common sorrel
Common sorrel

Rumex acetosa Used in sauces and as a spinach or salad leaf; the sap can be used as a laundry stain-remover! The species belongs to a group of plants commonly known as docks. The leaves are acidic to taste and contain high levels of oxalic acid. The larvae of several species of butterflies and moths, including the blood-vein moth, feed on the leaves of sorrel

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Ribwort plantain
Ribwort plantain

Plantago lanceolata This flowers between April and October. Its seed heads remain for most of the winter providing food for goldfinches and other seed-eating birds. Not so popular with slugs and snails - they find the leaves unpalatable.

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Yarrow
Yarrow

Achillea millefolium A very variable species, occupying a wide range of habitats. Races have been recorded that are able to tolerate heavy metal contamination in soil. It flowers from June to August, sometimes into October, and the flowers are insect pollinated. A plant may produce up to 6,000 seeds.

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You will see our stencilled posts showing  where the newly planted areas are.

Click on the individual photos for more information.

Camassia
Camassia

Camassia quamash Native to N and W America, not widely naturalised in GB but survives in the wild where planted. Many bulb species are quite particular about good soil drainage, but Camassias are quite happy growing in wet soils like we have in Lords Hill

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Narcissus 'Thalia'
Narcissus 'Thalia'

Narcissus triandrus 'Thalia' Native to SW Europe but fairly widely naturalised in GB, this has a delicious scent and has a definite preference for damp soil.

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Early crocus
Early crocus

Crocus tommassinianus Native to SE Europe but widely naturalised in grassy places in GB, particularly Shamley Green! Provides early nectar and pollen for bees emerging from hibernation on warm spring days.

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Wild Carrot
Wild Carrot

Daucus carota Like the cultivated carrot, the root is edible while young, but it quickly becomes too woody to consume. There is often a dark floret in the centre of the flower head, which may attract pollinating insects mistaking it for a mating opportunity!

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White Campion
White Campion

Silene latifolia (or S. alba) This flowers throughout the summer, and at night the blooms produce a heady scent, attracting many feeding moths.

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Yellow Rattle
Yellow Rattle

Rhinanthus minor The flowers are pollinated by large bees (especially bumblebees) and are followed by large, inflated seed pods. When these ripen and dry, the seed inside rattles around. Yellow-rattle lives a semi-parasitic life by feeding off the nutrients in the roots of nearby grasses.

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Cowslip
Cowslip

Primula veris The common name cowslip may derive from the old English for cow dung, probably because the plant was often found growing amongst the manure in cow pastures. Another source of early pollen and nectar.

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Rough Hawkbit
Rough Hawkbit

Leontodon hispidus The solitary dandelion-like flowers, which appear from late May to October, are a rich golden yellow with the outer florets often reddish or orange. If you look at the hairs on the leaves with a magnifying glass you will see that they have a little fork at the tips.

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Lady's Bedstraw
Lady's Bedstraw

Galium verum Frothy, yellow flowers scent the air with honey from June to September. Dried, the flowers have the scent of new-mown hay, and the name is probably derived from the tradition of stuffing straw mattresses with them.

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Additional species planted

These 14 species are either non-native to Britain or had not been previously recorded in Shamley Green either by us or BSBI. In a few cases it may be that they were here in small numbers and were missed. They will be a valuable addition to the flora for pollinating insects, particularly early in the year. 

Field scabious
Field scabious

Knautia arvensis This has a very long flowering period and so is a valuable nectar source for bees and butterflies. Each plant can produce up to 50 flowers! Finches and linnets love the seeds of this plant.

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Devils bit scabious
Devils bit scabious

Succisa pratensis This can be found in damp meadows and marshes, and along woodland rides and riverbanks. It is in bloom between July and October, its pincushion-like flower heads attracting a wide variety of bees and insects. It is also the foodplant for the declining Marsh fritillary butterfly.

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Ragged Robin
Ragged Robin

Silene flos-cuculi This has suffered a decline as the wet meadows, rush-pastures and fens where it grows have been drained and improved for agriculture. The flowers are an important source of nectar for butterflies and long-tongued bees.

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Musk Mallow
Musk Mallow

Malva moschata This favours dry places and may be found on roadside verges, in hedgerows, pastures and along the edges of fields. The plant gives off a delicate dusky perfume in warm weather. It is popular with bees who visit the flowers for nectar and pollen.

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Small scabious
Small scabious

Scabiosa columbaria A pretty perennial native to the UK, bearing pale purple flowers on branched stems from early summer and well into autumn. The flowers are especially popular with bees, butterflies and hoverflies.

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Wildflower Turf

On the greens at Hullmead and by Malthouse we also laid some wildflower turf, containing a further 10 existing species: Autumn hawkbit, Bird's foot trefoil, Bladder campion, Cat's ear, Common vetch, Meadowsweet, Perforate St. John's wort, Tufted vetch, Wild marjoram, and Red clover.

It also contains Toadflax, Kidney vetch and Meadow cranesbill, previously unrecorded here, and two fine grasses , Sheep's fescue and Crested dog's tail, which won't swamp the wildflowers.

We will be monitoring which species do well: we will assess whether it is worth the extra expense of turf to ensure they thrive, or if  plug plants will cope adequately with the conditions here, or maybe the cheapest option of some limited scarifying and scattering of seed is sufficient.

For plans showing the planted areas click here.

And for a full list of all the wildflower species planted click here.